Captain Samuel Brown comes to Paxton House

The only known portrait of Captain Samuel Brown has recently been lent by Brighton and Hove Museum and Art Gallery to Paxton House and now hangs in the Entrance Hall near to the Alexander Naysmith painting of the Union Chain Bridge.

British (English) School; Captain Samuel Brown; Brighton and Hove Museums and Art Galleries; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/captain-samuel-brown-74367

British (English) School; Captain Samuel Brown; Brighton and Hove Museums and Art Galleries;


Brighton and Hove Museums and Art Galleries have the painting in their collection because of the Royal Suspension Chain Pier that can be seen in the background to the right of Captain Brown. This was the first of Brighton’s piers and was built in 1823, three years after the Union Chain Bridge was opened and two years after the similar Trinity Chain Pier at Leith. Before it became the booming seaside pleasure resort we still know today, it was one of many ports trading with Europe. The Chain Pier was built to enable ships from Dieppe to load and unload cargoes. It’s demise started with the coming of the railways in 1841 and the building of the much larger West Pier in 1866. It was abandoned and swept away in a storm in 1896.
Royal Suspension Chain Pier, 1823

Royal Suspension Chain Pier, built 1823


The portrait can be viewed as part of the excellent Paxton House tours.

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